Lock and Roll: Secrets from the Rear Triangle

October 5, 2014

Before we send each new Mission Bicycle out into the world, we talk to its owner about about the best way to lock a bike. While the necessary level of security can change with each neighborhood or zip code, being prepared is essential so you can have as much fun off your bike as on. Well... almost as much fun.

Take a close look at these two bikes and how they are locked. Which one is more secure?

Answer: Neither. Both. They are exactly the same, securing both the bike frame and rear wheel with a steel U-lock.

But how, you ask? If you lock your rear wheel inside the rear triangle, as shown in the second picture, you have effectively secured your entire frame as well.

We show folks this trick all the time and get plenty of skeptical looks and polite rebuttals, but trust us, it works. No amount of wiggling can remove the lock from the rear triangle and therefore the bike from the rack.

If your U-lock has the space, grab the rim, bike rack, and frame. It sends a stronger visual message. But if your locking scenario won't accomodate all three, lock the rim inside the rear triangle (as shown) with confidence.

Image courtesy SF SAFE Bikes

The best bike locks are keyed U-locks from manufacturers like Kryptonite, Abus, and Onguard. Never, ever use a cable lock to secure your frame.

To make your bike truly secure, add security to the front wheel and saddle to keep all components in place.

For wheels we use locking axle nuts (above). A unique security design replaces the traditional hex nut. For solid axles only, here.

Our saddle bolts have a center pin to frustrate would be theives by requiring the corresponding allen wrench. We offer sets for Mission bikes to replace both the seatpost bolt(s) and the seatpost binder, here.

Knowing the best way to lock a bicycle will allow worry free roaming. Don't forfeit your trusted ride, or your afternoon's enjoyment. Lock up.